September 24, 2021

Spatial inspiration

In 1995, launching commercial satellite rockets was still a young industry. Unless you work in a government agency, manned spaceflight seems to have a long way to go.
Nevertheless, Branson is still thinking about how to send humans into space. According to Virgin Galactic, Branson and Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin had a conversation about which technique is best.
According to reports, the two agreed that it would be cheaper and safer to launch a spacecraft from an airplane rather than from the ground. Branson then ordered Virgin Atlantic employees to pay close attention to advances in space technology.
Fast forward to 1996, and the market began to change. Ansari XPrize launched a mission to award $10 million to the first NGO that can send a reusable spacecraft with personnel into space twice within two weeks.
Branson was registered as a trademark of “Virgin Galactic” in 1999, while looking for technologies that could bring his brand into space.
X Prize
Three years later, Branson believes he has found a winner. Some of his employees enthusiastically introduced him to Scaled Composites, which is building SpaceShipOne to compete with XPrize.
Scaled Composites only received funding from Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. Branson quickly agreed to work with Allen’s company, Mojave Aerospace Ventures, to license the SpaceShipOne technology to prepare for the commercial fleet of spacecraft.
In late September 2004, Branson announced that Virgin Atlantic would sponsor the SpaceShipOne XPrize flight. Not only that, if Scaled Composites wins, Virgin Atlantic is ready to support the company in building commercial spacecraft.
“Virgin Galactic can now begin a roadmap that will conduct the world’s first affordable space tourism flight within two to three years,” the company announced. The registration opens immediately.
days later, the XPrize game ended. SpaceShipOne returned to Earth safely for the second time on October 4, 2004. It’s time to start working on that space line. In 2004, the
SpaceShipOne controlled by Brian Binnie made the second suborbital flight in a week and won the $ 10 million Ansari X Prize flying wallet. In 2004, the
SpaceShipOne controlled by Brian Binnie made the second suborbital flight in a week and won the $ 10 million Ansari X Prize flying wallet. (Photo credit: Brian Binnie / Mike Mills)
Incidents and Delays
In December 2005, New Mexico officially provided Virgin Galactic with a $ 225 million taxpayer-funded facility called the US Spaceport flights. The construction and development of
occupied Virgin’s attention for years to come. But spaceflight, especially manned spaceflight, is a tricky business. A fatal explosion and development delays have repeatedly pushed back the date of the manned spaceflight.
Throughout the delay, Branson projected a positive image of spaceflight. Your clients have been insisting; only a few people have withdrawn from the project and at least 530 people have already deposited deposits for their $ 200,000 space ticket.
Branson also regularly posts progress updates and will often check out the spacecraft that is taking shape. She frequently invites Virgin Galactic paying customers to attend events or press conferences to keep abreast of the situation and provide insight into customer service.
Related: How Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo works (infographic) The first rocket-powered test flight of
SpaceShipTwo took place in April 2013, another in September 2013, and then in January 2014. Every flight went smoothly, and the Enterprise flew to the sky at a faster speed.
But the tragedy occurred during the fourth rocket-powered flight on October 31, 2014, when the vehicle broke down. The accident resulted in the death of co-pilot Michael Alsbury and the injury of pilot Peter Siebold. A blog post published by
Branson in early January 2015 stated that he briefly doubted whether it was a good idea to continue to develop SpaceShipTwo after the accident, but when he returned to the Mojave Desert in California, his promise was received. To reiterate.

 

Link Link Link Link Link Link Link Link Link Link Link 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *