September 16, 2021

Supermassive black holes may cause huge swirling gas tsunami

Will the gas escaping from the gravitational control of the supermassive black hole form a “tsunami” in space?
In a new study funded by NASA, astrophysicists used computer simulations to simulate the environment around a supermassive black hole in deep space. They discovered that huge tsunami-like structures may form near these black holes. These structures are essentially huge, rotating walls of gas that barely escape the strong gravitational pull of the black holes. They even think that supermassive black holes can contain the largest tsunami structure in the universe.
Astrophysicist Daniel Proga of the University of Las Vegas, Nevada (UNLV) said: “The laws governing phenomena on Earth are the laws of physics that can explain things in outer space and even far away from black holes.” NASA statement. Gallery
: The Black Hole of the Universe
This artist’s visualization shows a supermassive black hole surrounded by dust and gas, forming a tsunami on its outer edge. The added close-up shows the tsunami in more detail.
The artist’s visualization shows a supermassive black hole whose outer edge is surrounded by tsunami-forming dust and gas. The added close-up shows the tsunami in more detail.
(Image source: Nima Abkenar’s illustration)
In this study, the researchers took a closer look at the strange environment around the supermassive black hole and how gas and radiation interact there.
Supermassive black holes sometimes surround large amounts of gas and matter and will eventually provide them with nutrients in a combined system called active galactic nuclei. These systems often eject jets of material, emitting bright, brilliant X-rays onto the disk, just outside the gravitational range of the black hole. This X-ray radiation pushes the wind that flows from the center of the system. This is called “outflow.”
The researchers believe that this X-ray radiation may also help explain the denser regions of gas around the supermassive black hole called “clouds.”

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“These clouds are 10 times the temperature of the sun’s surface and move at the speed of the solar wind, so they are very strange objects. You don’t want airplanes to fly over,” said lead author and postdoctoral researcher Tim Waters, a UNLV researcher , Who is also a visiting scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, said in the same statement.
The team used computer simulations to show how the atmosphere of a disk revolving around a black hole can begin to form waves of gas and matter when it is far enough away from the black hole to be unreachable. Coupled with external winds propelled by X-ray radiation, these waves can turn into huge tsunamis. The researchers found that these gas wave vortices can extend up to 10 light years above the disk. The statement stated that once these sun-like structures are formed, they will no longer be affected by the black hole’s gravity.
In these simulations, the researchers showed how bright X-ray radiation near a black hole seeps into pockets of hot gas in the atmosphere outside the disk. These hot plasma bubbles expand at the edge of the disk into a nearby cooler gas, helping to stimulate a tsunami-like structure. The bubbles also block the outflow of the wind and spiral into independent structures light years in size. These side structures are called Carmen Vortex Streets, and they are weather patterns that also appear on Earth (although on Earth, the patterns of this vortex look very different).
Carmen Vortex Street is named after Theo Named after Do Von Carmen. It also marks the boundary between the earth’s atmosphere and space. Statement
stated that this study is contrary to previous theories, which believe that hot gas clouds near the active galactic nucleus spontaneously form due to fluid instability. This study also contradicts the previous view that the magnetic field is necessary to move the cooler gas from the disk surrounding the supermassive black hole.
Although there are currently no satellites that can confirm their work, the team hopes to back up their findings through future research and telescope observations. Additionally, according to NASA’s statement, NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and the European Space Agency’s XMM Newton Space Telescope observed plasma near the core of an active galaxy consistent with the team’s findings.

 

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